Friday, May 29, 2009

'Conversational' 'Dead' Languages, V

The conversation continues:
Mike has his own contribution with a helpful set of links to the whole ongoing dialogue so far, as well as a guest post by Daniel Street, who has kindly allowed me to post a copy of his Greek exam from Spring Semester.

I hope to come back to the conversation when I have some spare time to gather some more thoughts.

5 comments:

Topher said...

I find it particularly interesting that question A_3 uses the phrase ούτος τελώνης, which is more reminiscent of English grammar than Greek...

Daniel Streett said...

Topher, I'm guessing you mean that the proper way to say it in Greek would be ουτος ο τελωνης. I left out the article (typical of a second language learner to mess up the article). I'm sure you can find lots of these types of mistakes. As I tell my students, I'm a victim of the grammar-translation method, and I still think in English, not Greek. I would be very interested to see any quizzes or tests that you have developed. An exchange of ideas and resources is always beneficial.

Topher said...

Daniel, it's always easier to find mistakes than to make progress. To be fair, I should point out that I'm very interested in the approach you're taking and that I appreciated having the exam as a tangible example of what you're doing. Keep going, and keep letting everyone know how it's working out.

I'm afraid that I can't give you my own examples, as I've never taught Greek.

Daniel Streett said...

Topher, thanks for your response. I would love to have a clearinghouse where profs could post readings and quizzes and have people with an eagle eye for detail (like you) suggest edits and emendations. See the recently created Tarheel Reader for a great example. Here's the link for Latin: http://tarheelreader.org/tag/latin/

Topher said...

Daniel, you might consider starting a Google group as a resource for Greek teachers. You would be able to carry on useful discussions, and exchange resources. If I were teaching, I would welcome such a resource. (Of course, the trick is making so that your students don't come to appreciate it as a way to gain advance copies of their exams).